An evaluation of the character of petruchio in the novel the taming of the shrew by william shakespe

Hortensio suggests that he marry Kate Minola, the daughter of one of the wealthiest men in the city, particularly because Hortensio can not court her sister Bianca until Kate is married.

taming of the shrew petruchio character traits

She still has the passion and energy she began with, but with a realization that her actions affect others. Through her word choices, one can see that she has truly fallen in love with Petruchio.

This same spunk is reflected other times in the same speech, despite its strong patriarchal message.

Bianca taming of the shrew

The Man Loves Money Petruchio's not a hard one to figure out — in fact, he's pretty honest throughout the play. If she had meant it to be sarcastic, this admission of being cared for would seem out of place and misguided. Source Kate's Desire for Love Kate desires love, regardless of how unloving and unlovable she begins. It has lasted many years, and is still as great as the original. No, sir, God forbid; but ashamed to kiss. Petruchio then starts to try to "tame" his wife in a variety of ways. His concept of sexuality is quite pragmatic, as soon as he believes that he has got a wife, he wants to consummate the marriage, which seems most natural to him. In one sense, she is hungry and will say anything to be allowed to eat the meat, regardless of its state. Basically, Petruchio deploys some tried and true torture techniques — starvation, sleep deprivation, psychological manipulation, and good old fashioned humiliation — to get Kate to behave the way he wants. On the other hand, some see Petruchio as the fool of the play and attribute his actions to intended comic relief. Many critics point out that Petruchio teaches Kate how to play-act, to perform a role other than "shrew. One popular opinion is that Petruchio is, for the most part, a selfish misogynist determined to tame Katharine for his own convenience and pride. It seems as if Petruchio surprises even himself when he realizes that although he outwardly wishes to marry for money, when it comes to it, he is motivated by something else: the desire to love and be loved.

Their love is based on more than romantic attraction or blind submission of the wife, they are friends and companions. When Bianca and Lucentio are married, Petruchio refuses to let Kate go to the wedding unless she agrees with everything he says, regardless of the validity of his claims. At the same time that the play portrays domestic violence on stage, Big Willy Shakespeare leaves open the possibility that anyone who tries to follow Petruchio's advice and behavior is a total idiot.

His concept of sexuality is quite pragmatic, as soon as he believes that he has got a wife, he wants to consummate the marriage, which seems most natural to him.

Although in many film texts this is not the case. For instance, purposely arriving late, wearing conspicuously inappropriate attire, and behaving in a completely improper manner at the wedding mark Petruchio's initial steps in getting a wife worth more than merely her money.

For instance, once the marriage ceremony ends, she desires to stay for the reception, whereas Petruchio wants to leave.

Taming of the shrew summary

Tillyard, E. Their love is based on more than romantic attraction or blind submission of the wife, they are friends and companions. She is talking amongst both men and women, yet all listen. He believes that the only way to get through to Katharine is by giving her a taste of her own medicine. Her quarrelsome behavior is not entirely due to her lack of being loved, but also her self-absorption. Petruchio is violent and rude toward his servants, and heavily misogynistic toward Katherine. You see, Petruchio sees himself as the ultimate shrew taming champion — he even tutors other men on how to get their wives in line.

Well, if the sun is shining in the middle of the afternoon and Petruchio says the moon is very pretty this evening, everybody has to agree that yes, the moon is very pretty indeed. The characters bring up a traditional concept of male domination.

On the other hand, some see Petruchio as the fool of the play and attribute his actions to intended comic relief. If she had been completely broken of spirit, she would have simply agreed without an elaborate speech.

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Katharina and Petruchio from The Taming of the Shrew by