Sat persuasive essay

Allusion — A reference to a book, movie, song, etc. If the speaker or writer shows that he or she understands the plight of the audience, they will be more supportive.

sat essay examples pdf

Humor — Jokes and funny language. If not, ask your English teacher!

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Read the text. Hyperbole — Exaggeration Understatement — Making something sound much less than it is.

Sat essay rhetorical devices

Repetition — Mentioning a word or phrase several times. If you want to practice picking them out, read the opinion columns in a newspaper. Fear no more… The SAT essay is an analytical essay: you are presented with a passage of persuasive text, and asked to analyze how the writer effectively persuades his or her audience. Metaphors and similes. Slang — A type of informal diction, often regional. Your task is to analyze how that author uses rhetorical devices and persuasive strategies to persuade the reader. Personification — Giving a nonhuman thing human qualities. Imagery — Language that appeals to the senses, most often visual Diction — Word choice.

The student responses provided in the following set illustrate common score combinations earned on the redesigned SAT. Students are given a text—an essay, article, or speech, perhaps—in which the author is making some kind of argument.

Assonance — Repeated vowel sounds.

Sat essay examples to use

Anything that makes the audience feel good about themselves, or feel particularly united as a group will encourage people to support them. The essays have been typed exactly as each student wrote his or her essay, without corrections to spelling, punctuation, or paragraph breaks. Testimony — Quoting from people who have something to say about the issue. Depending on the tone and context of the passage, this could also involve humour Soundbites: short phrases that summarise your point help people to remember, and thus agree with the writer. Each body paragraph should be devoted to a different rhetorical device or persuasive strategy. Imagery — Language that appeals to the senses, most often visual Diction — Word choice. Parallelism — Writing constructed in a similar, symmetrical manner. It is important to note that although these are representative samples of student ability at each score point, the set itself does not exhaustively illustrate the range of skills in Reading, Analysis, and Writing associated with each score point. Syntax — Sentence structure. Often accompanied by logos.

Your task is to analyze how that author uses rhetorical devices and persuasive strategies to persuade the reader. A good argument uses powerful examples to prove the point Using an analogy likening a situation to another that the audience may be more familiar with helps to illustrate the point, or make the opposing argument look ridiculous.

Sat persuasive essay

Fear no more… The SAT essay is an analytical essay: you are presented with a passage of persuasive text, and asked to analyze how the writer effectively persuades his or her audience. The list goes on… Logos — An appeal to logic. Juxtaposition — Holding two things up to compare or contrast them. Underline instances wherein the author employs these rhetorical devices and persuasive strategies and name them in the margins. Alliteration — Several words that share the same first letter. Now memorize these rhetorical devices and learn to recognize them when they appear! Jargon — Specialized language. Read the text. Symbolism — One thing represents something else. Metaphor — Saying one thing IS another thing.

The scores are presented in order by domain directly preceding each sample essay. In your essay, you should demonstrate that you have read the passage carefully, present a clear and logical analysis, and use language precisely.

sat essay tips

The essays have been typed exactly as each student wrote his or her essay, without corrections to spelling, punctuation, or paragraph breaks. Asking a rhetorical question a question that everyone knows the answer to is a powerful way of making people agree with you in their heads.

Knowing these rhetorical devices and persuasive strategies—and being able to recognize them, quote them when they occur, and analyze their effect on the reader—will go a long way toward helping you achieve a higher SAT essay score. The student responses provided in the following set illustrate common score combinations earned on the redesigned SAT. Underline instances wherein the author employs these rhetorical devices and persuasive strategies and name them in the margins. Your task is to analyze how that author uses rhetorical devices and persuasive strategies to persuade the reader. As a general rule, you should pick 3 of these things that you can identify in the passage, and write a paragraph about each of them. Assonance — Repeated vowel sounds. If not, ask your English teacher! Personification — Giving a nonhuman thing human qualities. Syntax — Sentence structure. Go forth and conquer the SAT essay now that you know these rhetorical devices and persuasive strategies. Verbal irony: Saying one thing and meaning the opposite. There are always plenty of these devices to be found there! Do not write your essay in this booklet. Now memorize these rhetorical devices and learn to recognize them when they appear!
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The SAT Essay: Overview (article)